Half grapefruit soda, half Stiegl.
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boursier
1 hour ago
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San Francisco, CA / שיקגו
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boursier
2 days ago
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San Francisco, CA / שיקגו
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Radical outside, rustic inside

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The size of a bedroom, the Nolla cabin is perfect for the idyllic holiday. Its design, aside from being highly characteristic, is also comfortable, and sustainable. Named after the Finnish word for zero, the Nolla cabin’s purpose is literally to give you a zero-worry, zero-emission holiday.

Built with a tent-like shape, the Nolla aims at giving you the very same feeling, when sunlight creeps into its interiors through the triangular glass facade on the front. Made entirely from local pine and plywood, the Nolla doesn’t use any fasteners to hold it in place, but rather, pieces together like a massive puzzle. The cabin can be transported and assembled without the need for heavy machinery, and it comes with adjustable pedestals, giving you the freedom to set the Nolla up on any sort of terrain.

With its small, wood-themed interior space, the Nolla forces you to pack less when you travel (less luggage, less waste), and focus more on the beautiful, contemplative environment around it rather than anything else. Running entirely on solar panels, the Nolla maintains a zero carbon footprint. It comes with two beds, a table, and a stove that runs on renewable diesel made entirely from waste. In fact, the boat that takes you to the Nolla cabin in Vallisaari from Helsinki runs on renewable diesel too!

Designer: Robin Falck

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boursier
30 days ago
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San Francisco, CA / שיקגו
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Research Suggests Facebook Fueled Anti-Refugee Attacks in Germany

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Amanda Taub and Max Fisher, reporting for The New York Times:

Karsten Müller and Carlo Schwarz, researchers at the University of Warwick, scrutinized every anti-refugee attack in Germany, 3,335 in all, over a two-year span. In each, they analyzed the local community by any variable that seemed relevant. Wealth. Demographics. Support for far-right politics. Newspaper sales. Number of refugees. History of hate crime. Number of protests.

One thing stuck out. Towns where Facebook use was higher than average, like Altena, reliably experienced more attacks on refugees. That held true in virtually any sort of community — big city or small town; affluent or struggling; liberal haven or far-right stronghold — suggesting that the link applies universally.

Their reams of data converged on a breathtaking statistic: Wherever per-person Facebook use rose to one standard deviation above the national average, attacks on refugees increased by about 50 percent.

And the effect apparently works the other way, too:

Could Facebook really distort social relations to the point of violence? The University of Warwick researchers tested their findings by examining every sustained internet outage in their study window. German internet infrastructure tends to be localized, making outages isolated but common. Sure enough, whenever internet access went down in an area with high Facebook use, attacks on refugees dropped significantly.

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boursier
30 days ago
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San Francisco, CA / שיקגו
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1 public comment
wmorrell
29 days ago
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Delete facebook. Nuke it from orbit. It’s the only way to be sure.
MotherHydra
27 days ago
Indeed, and great reference.

filesaveas:Manual / Process Journal

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Manual / Process Journal

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boursier
30 days ago
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San Francisco, CA / שיקגו
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You can now build your own miniature walking Strandbeest!

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Chances are, whether you’re a designer or not, you’ll have seen Theo Jansen’s massive kinetic sculptures walking across a beach in BMW’s advertisement. Titled the Strandbeest, these incredible automata gracefully walk across land using wind as their driving force, as they move, much like animals do, using large wooden legs in a graceful fashion. The Strandbeest was one of the reasons I fell in love with industrial design, and the fact that you can build your own miniature versions today is giving me major nostalgic feels!

The Heyzlass Mini Strandbeest is a miniature replication of Jansen’s large, hulking creature. Made out of plastic and built to be a spitting image of the original, the Mini Strandbeest comes with a fan at one end that catches the wind, propelling the legs to move in their cyclical fashion and have the entire toy gently sashay across a flat surface. Made from 117 separate parts that don’t need any special tools to assemble, the Mini Strandbeest can be built in just around 90 minutes, which is well worth the endless hours of joy you’ll get from observing one of the most fascinating mechanical actions of all time!

Designer: Heyzlass

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boursier
42 days ago
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San Francisco, CA / שיקגו
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